Author Archive

Rising sea levels torment coastal US

USA Today: One block from the beach on the narrow Willoughby Spit, Bob Parsons was watching the weather news on TV in November 2009 when brackish water suddenly oozed up through the floors of his home and poured in from the front and back doors. He and his wife, Carole, lugged filing cabinets and a restored wingback chair upstairs but didn't have time to move the car, parked on the street-turned-waterway, The car was totaled, and the house needed thousands of dollars' worth of repairs. Since that storm,...

Environmentalists diss State Dept.’s Keystone pipeline review

USA Today: The State Department riled environmentalists with a largely positive review Friday of a controversial Canada-to-U.S. pipeline, saying the project would not significantly alter the development of Canada's tar sands. In its long-awaited draft environmental review of the Keystone XL, the State Department said the pipeline won't make much of a difference to climate change because the tar sands will likely be developed anyway. "Approval or denial of the proposed project is unlikely to have a substantial...

Thousands gather for climate change rally in DC

USA Today: In what was billed as the largest climate rally in U.S. history, thousands of people marched past the White House on Sunday to urge President Obama to reject a controversial pipeline and take other steps to fight climate change. Organizers, including the Sierra Club, estimated that more than 35,000 people from 30-plus states -- some dressed as polar bears -- endured frigid temperatures to join the "Forward on Climate" rally, although the crowd size could not be confirmed. Their immediate target...

Climate change report: Seas rising, heat waves ahead

USA Today: Climate change is already affecting how Americans live and work, and evidence is mounting that the burning of fossil fuels has roughly doubled the probability of extreme heat waves, the Obama administration said Friday. "Sea level is rising, oceans are becoming more acidic, and glacier and Arctic Sea ice are melting," says a draft of the third federal Climate Assessment Report, compiled by more than 240 scientists for a federal advisory committee. "These changes are part of the pattern of global...

Study: Climate change threatens Atlantic seashores

USA Today: Climate change is already hurting seven national seashores on the Atlantic Coast and threatens to submerge some of their land within a century, according to a report Wednesday by environmental groups. In five of the seven parks, more than half of the land lies low enough (less than 3.3 feet) to risk becoming submerged by the year 2100, says the report by the Rocky Mountain Climate Organization and the Natural Resources Defense Council. Those parks include Fire Island in New York, Assateague Island...

Study: Most U.S. forests not adapting to climate change

USA Today: More than half of Eastern U.S. tree species are not adapting to climate change as quickly or consistently as predicted, posing risks for their survival, says a new Duke University-led study. Previous climate models had predicted that trees would migrate to higher latitudes and elevations as temperatures warm but such a northward migration is not happening, according to the study that analyzed decades of data from the U.S. Forest Service. The scientists examined 92 tree species at 43,334 forest plots...

Hundreds arrested during pipeline protest at White House

USA Today: Mary Mann, a 68-year-old grandmother from Atlanta, had never been arrested "” until this week in front of the White House. "I'm tremendously concerned about our children," says the petite woman in sneakers and a floppy sun hat. She's holding a sign with a campaign appeal President Obama once made to free America from the "tyranny of oil." Mann is one of 842 Americans who had been arrested through Thursday during a two-week protest — ending today — against a controversial U.S.-Canadian pipeline....

Oxfam: Food prices to double amid climate change

USA Today: The price of staple foods such as corn, already high, could more than double in the next 20 years, and climate change is responsible for up to half of this expected increase, warns a report Tuesday by the international aid organization Oxfam. The world's poorest people will be hardest hit as the demand for food rises 70% by 2050 while the world's capacity to increase food production declines, according to the "Growing a Better Future" report. Oxfam released the report as part its new global GROW...