Gogebic Taconite says Wisconsin mine isn’t feasible; cites wetlands, EPA

WSJ: The company that promised a huge mine in northern Wisconsin announced Friday that it was dropping the controversial project because it is not feasible. “We don’t want to throw out false hope,” Gogebic Taconite president Bill Williams told the State Journal. “Our parent company felt there wasn’t enough certainty to it.” State Republicans crusaded for the mine starting in 2011, saying it would create thousands of jobs in an economically distressed area, but scientists warned of possible environmental...

Wisc: Gogebic dropping plans massive iron mine

Journal Sentinel: Gogebic Taconite said Friday afternoon that it was closing its office in Hurley after concluding that the expanse of wetlands at the site made the prospects of constructing a massive iron ore mine unfeasible. The company said it would continue to investigate prospects for an iron ore mine in Ashland and Iron counties, but officials said work would be sharply curtailed. With the exception of one, all personnel were being furloughed. The chief engineer will continue to work on the project as...

Mining company closing office in northern Wisconsin

Associated Press: The company looking to open an iron ore mine in northern Wisconsin announced Friday it was closing its office in Hurley, saying future investment was "unfeasible at this time," a move that marks the end for now of the project near Lake Superior that sparked fierce debate and opposition from environmentalists and tribal members near the site. Bill Williams, president of mining company Gogebic Taconite, released a statement announcing the decision. It comes after field explorations were put on hold...

Leak Is Disclosed at Nuclear Plant

New York Times: The operator of the ruined Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant said Tuesday that it had neglected to stop a leak of radioactive water into the Pacific Ocean since last May. The operator, Tokyo Electric Power Co., said it had first detected the flow of contaminated rainwater nine months ago, but did not explain why it had been so slow in responding. The company, known as Tepco, said it would place sandbags to block the leak of water, which it said was too small to change radiation levels in the...

Lester Brown: ‘World is overusing resources on a scale that’s dangerous’

Guardian: Laurence Mathieu-Léger

The remote Alaskan village that needs to be relocated due to climate change

Washington Post: This tiny and isolated town of 400 cannot be reached by road. It lies on a fragile barrier island along the Chukchi Sea, 83 miles above the Arctic circle. And for generations, the Iñupiat people of the region have hunted gigantic bowhead whales from camps atop the sea ice that stretches out from the town’s icy shores. But in recent years, climate change has thinned the ice so much that it has become too dangerous to hunt the whales. Soon, the U.S. government says, it may be too dangerous to live...

Climate Change Will Hit America in Breadbasket, Scientists Say

NBC: Climate experts have seen the future of America's breadbasket — and from their perspective, it doesn't look pretty. "I don't want to be a wheat farmer in Kansas in the future," said Harold Brooks, a senior scientist at the National Severe Storms Laboratory in Norman, Oklahoma. Brooks isn't a wheat farmer. He's a researcher who has analyzed how climate change could affect the weather in America's midsection, based on historical data and computer modeling. Last year, he and his colleagues found...

‘Invest more’ in protected areas

BBC: The world's national parks and nature reserves receive eight billion tourist visits a year, generating around $600bn of spending, according to research. The tourism income vastly outweighs the $10bn a year spent safeguarding them, says a Cambridge University team. The study, published in PLOS Biology, highlights the need for more investment in protected areas, they say. The idea of natural capital, the worth of natural assets, is increasingly being used in policy making. It is based on...

Obama’s Keystone XL Veto Not a Death Blow to Pipeline

Climate Central: President Obama on Tuesday vetoed the bill Congress passed this month forcing approval of the proposed Keystone XL Pipeline. But the project isn't dead yet, and the U.S. State Department's long approval process for the Keystone XL continues. The bill, an effort by Congress to override the State Department's protracted environmental review of the pipeline, would have authorized TransCanada to build the $8 billion Keystone XL along 875 miles of U.S. soil from the Canadian border in Montana to Steele...

Obama blocks Keystone pipeline in rare veto of Republican bill

Guardian: Barack Obama has blocked a Republican bill that would allow a contentious extension of the Keystone oil pipeline, in a rare veto that arrived in low-key fashion but leaves open a long road to the end of his presidency. Though long expected and downplayed by the White House, the symbolic clash over a pipeline from Canadian tar sands to US refineries on the Gulf coast is the first time the president has refused to sign legislation in his second term, and only the third veto of his presidency. Obama...