Author Archive

Increasing water on land slowing down rising seas

Indo Asian News Service: While ice sheets and glaciers continue to melt, climate change over the past decade has caused Earth's continents to soak up and store an extra 3.2 trillion tons of water in soils, lakes and underground aquifers -- temporarily slowing the rate of sea level rise by about 20 percent, scientists have revealed. New measurements from a NASA satellite have allowed researchers from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, California and University of California-Irvine, to identify and quantify,...

Ancient farmers caused first global warming

Indo Asian News Service: Ancient farmers were responsible for increasing the Earth's temperature by about 0.9 degree Celsius over a period of 8,000 years - almost as much as global warming has caused in the past 150 years. The finding, by a new study, suggests that early agriculture was as powerful as the whole industrial revolution, says Feng He, lead author and a climate scientist at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. The study, however, says that the "net warming" caused by early humans was only 0.73 degrees Celsius,...

‘Warmer soils spew more carbon into air’

Indo Asian News Service: Warmer soils spew additional carbon into the atmosphere under the impact of climate change, US research says. The study, conducted by Serita Frey, professor from the University of New Hampshire and others, throws new light on how soil bugs respond to temperature and could finetune predictions of how warming will affect the carbon dioxide (CO2) flux from soils. Activities of soil bugs release 10 times the CO2 that human do on a yearly basis. This release of CO2 has been kept in check by plants'...

Loss of microbes in deforestation harming Amazon

Indo Asian News Service: Researchers have sounded alarm bells over the loss of microbes helping preserve the Amazon ecosystem following its systematic deforestation. "We found that after rainforest conversion to agricultural pastures, bacterial communities were significantly different from those of forest soils," said Klaus Nusslein from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, an expert in tropical rain forest microbial soil communities, who led the microbiologists. Nusslein and colleagues studied a large farm site over...