Author Archive

The Bizarre Reason Greenland Is Getting Darker Each Year

Gizmodo: Greenland is one of the brightest spots on planet Earth, but ominously enough, its gleaming surface darkens with each passing year, thanks to a strange series of physical processes, one of which cannot be seen with the naked eye. According to a fascinating new study led by Columbia's Earth Institute and published today the journal The Cryosphere, which finds that Greenland's "albedo," or reflectivity, has been decreasing since the mid 90s. By the end of the 21st century, Greenland could be ten...

Not All Frogs Are Doomed By That Deadly Amphibian Fungus

Gizmodo: For twenty years, the deadly fungal disease Bd has been wiping out amphibians across the world. But a new study offers hope that some frogs will be spared, thanks in part to an unexpected savior: climate change. It’s not often that we hear about positive impacts of anthropogenic climate change. And yet, a team of scientists at the Wildlife Conservation Society is now predicting that in Africa’s Albertine Rift--one of the most biodiverse places on the planet--global warming will cause Bd’s range...

Alaskan Forest Fires Could Make Climate Change Much Worse

Gizmodo: If humans want to limit global warming, we’ll need to drastically reduce our carbon pollution. We might need to do so even faster than our models suggest, because as scientists are now discovering, there’s an additional factor working against us: fire. Last week, we learned that Indonesia is in the midst of a devastating fire season, one that’s sending as much carbon skyward as the entire US economy. Indonesia isn’t alone -- Western North America is currently recovering from one of the most brutal...

Climate Change Is Setting the World on Fire

Gizmodo: What happens when you mix record-smashing heat and exceptional drought? Fire! Lots of fire! But climate change isn’t just bringing more fires to our doorstep, although it’s accomplishing that quite handily. It’s making fire seasons longer. That’s according to a study published this week in Nature Communications, which shows that fire weather seasons have, on average, grown 18.7 percent longer across the Earth’s surface since 1979. What’s more, the global burnable area affected by fire seasons...